Witnessing History

THE CAMPAIGN AND BATTLE OF SHILOH: WHERE KENTUCKY BLED

THE CAMPAIGN AND BATTLE OF SHILOH: WHERE KENTUCKY BLED

$395.00

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Tour Dates:  October 25, 26, and 27, 2018

To defend the vast western frontier of the Confederacy in 1861, Jefferson Davis called upon fellow Kentuckian General Albert Sidney Johnston.  Johnston’s defense line extended in Kentucky from Columbus on the Mississippi River to near Cumberland Gap.  It was broken when Major General Ulysses S. Grant’s Army of the Tennessee ascended the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers and seized Forts Henry and Donelson in February 1862.  With no means to defend the interior of Tennessee against Grant’s forces that were in control of those rivers, Johnston withdrew to Corinth, Mississippi, below the great bend of the Tennessee River.  There, at the crossroads of two major railroads, Johnson assembled his Army of the Mississippi while Grant’s army moved south on the Tennessee River to Pittsburgh Landing and Major General Don Carlos Buell’s Army of the Ohio marched from Nashville to Savannah, Tennessee to join Grant.

To strike Grant before his army could be reinforced by Buell was Johnson’s aim.  “I would strike them if they were a million,” Johnston reportedly said on the eve of the battle.  Thus, on April 6, 1862, General Johnston, after moving his army just under twenty miles north of Corinth, struck Grant’s advanced divisions around Shiloh Church.  In so doing, he precipitated the bloodiest engagement on the North American continent up to that time.

In the middle of the swirling battle, Kentuckian fought Kentuckian.  Kentuckians, like Major General John C. Breckinridge, held prominent positions in Johnston’s army.  Kentuckians did so in Grant’s army, and, particularly, in Buell’s.  In fact, in Buell’s army were five brigadier generals from Kentucky: L. H. Rousseau, William Nelson, Thomas L. Crittenden, J. T. Boyle and Thomas J. Wood.  There were five infantry regiments, a cavalry regiment and a cavalry squadron and two artillery batteries from Kentucky in Johnston’s army.  In Grant’s, there were two infantry regiments, and in Buell’s, ten infantry regiments and one cavalry regiment from Kentucky.  Some Kentucky Confederate regiments actually fought Kentucky Union regiments on both days.  “Where Kentucky fought Kentucky,” noted Colonel William Preston of Louisville, just after the battle, “it was terrible.”  The fighting was ferocious; the casualties heavy.  Among the dead were not only General Johnston, but Kentucky’s Confederate Governor, George W. Johnson, who had volunteered as a private in the Fourth Kentucky Infantry.

The fee for the Tour and Seminar is $395.00 and includes lunches during the tour on October 26 and 27, the bus transportation, maps, and reading materials.  Sign up here with a credit card, debit card, or Paypal.  Or, you can download the Shiloh 2018 Signup Form and mail your registration to Witnessing History, P. O. Box 1208, Lexington, KY 40588-1208.

Participants must provide their own transportation to and from Corinth, Mississippi.

Headquarters will be at the Holiday Inn Express, 2106 Us Hwy 72w & Hwy 45 Bypass, Corinth, Mississippi.  Participants are responsible for their own rooms and meals, except as explicitly set forth herein.

*REGISTRATION FEES ARE NON-REFUNDABLE, AS WITNESSING HISTORY EDUCATION FOUNDATION, INC. USES THESE FEES TO PREPAY NON-REFUNDABLE DEPOSITS, FARES, FEES, LICENSES AND PERMITS.

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